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Launching Ticket to Work valuation of key outcomes report

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The Ticket to Work model uses a collaborative approach to support secondary students with disability to gain valuable career and work experience while at school, to support the transition into employment. The approach include schools, disability services, employers, employment organisations and other local partners.

An evaluation of the Ticket to Work model in 2019 found, amongst other things that participants are substantially more likely than a similar comparison group to:

  • complete Year 12,
  • work in open workplaces,
  • participate in the labour force, and
  • be involved in social activities.

The report by Social Ventures Australia (SVA) draws on the data from that study to estimate two scenarios: a Ticket to Work scenario and a ‘Business as Usual’ scenario, based on data about employment outcomes for young people with disability who did not participate in Ticket to Work.

The report then takes a conservative estimate of the financial value of the Ticket to Work outcomes.  It revealed an average financial benefit of $27,100 per participant over the three years of data they analysed.

The $27,100 figure includes increased income for the young person and their families, increased tax revenue, and a reduction in government expenditure such as NDIS and benefits paid such as the Disability Support Pension.

“What this report shows is when students with disability are supported to find work, the employment and economic outcomes are remarkable,” said Gillian Turnbull, Director at SVA. 

“The students with disability who participated in the Ticket to Work model were over three times more likely to be in employment in the community when they finished school compared to students that did not participate.”

 “The model grew out of research that showed participation in work during secondary school is the key indicator of post-school success for young people with disability,” said National Ticket to Work Manager, Michelle Wakeford.

Ticket to Work takes a collaborative approach to prepare high school students with disability for the world of work, which has resulted in participants having higher labour market participation, school completion, social participation and independence compared to other young people with similar disability.

Among the participants is Danielle Tascana, a year 11 student at Newcombe Secondary College who is vision impaired. She’s riding the wave of work, with an after school job at Ozmosis Surf and Skate.

“As Danielle is borderline legally blind, she has to take things easy for a while in a new surrounding until she works out what things are. But it hasn’t held her back,” said her grandmother, Dot.

“By having a part time job, Danielle has blossomed. She believes in herself now.” 

“We love having Danielle as part of our team here at Ozmosis. She has a great vibe that lifts the morale for the rest of the crew,” said store manager, Kristie Cain.

NDS CEO David Moody believes the Ticket to Work model stands to have a positive financial impact for both government and people with disability.

“Thousands of students with disability have taken part in the Ticket to Work initiative with incredible results. Many students who may not have finished school have not only accomplished that but gained meaningful employment and training.

“It’s so important right now that we work together to support young people with disability into employment. 

“If we are to prevent further disadvantage then the doors to employment need to be kept open as we re-build in the wake of the COVID economic downturn,” Mr Moody said.

NDS is urging the Commonwealth Government to adopt the learnings from the Ticket to Work model, with the research showing a modest investment will ensure far greater numbers of young people with disability gain access to meaningful employment each year.

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